Korean roasted salted laver

I love roasted salted laver, otherwise known as “gim” in Korean. Or maybe it’s more familiar if I call it “roasted salted nori.” On Japanese food packaging, I’ve seen it labelled, “Korean nori.” Food that is shared between Japan and Korea seems marked with battle over nomenclature, much like the battle over that sea between the two countries–is it an Asian Pear or a Japanese Pear? Or is it the East Sea or is it the Japan Sea?

Anyway, this is one of my favorite snack foods–gim has a savory flavor that is just so delicious, especially wrapped around a spoonful of rice. For many Koreans, some gim, rice, and kimchi makes for a wonderful and simple meal.

You can buy pre-prepared gim at Korean grocery stores, but what’s even better is buying untoasted laver and making the gim yourself–nothing tastes better than the freshly toasted stuff!

For years, I could not toast gim at home. Sadly, I owned an electric stove until recently when we purchased a six burner Wedgewood gas stove. Oh, that stove has opened up possibilities–and I just realized, also for toasting my own gim! It’s a simple enough process–take a square of laver (or nori), brush some sesame oil onto it, and then sprinkle salt (on a whim, I sprinkled on fleur de sel this morning to brilliant effect–but you can use Morton’s like my mother did).

Take that square of oiled, salted laver and wave it over the open flame of your stove. There are simple contraptions for keeping the square in place and keeping it flat (these tools resemble a grill basket that folds flat). Not using this contraption doesn’t affect the taste, but your laver will curl as it toasts. After your square is sufficiently toasted over the open flame, you may eat it! Cut it up in squares and use it to roll around white sticky rice, or eat it on its own, as my husband often does.

Update 9/17/06: After running around town at various Korean stores asking for “the thing you use when you roast gim,” I finally succeeded in procuring a suk-sae:

making gim (Korean roasted salted laver)

23 responses to “Korean roasted salted laver

  1. Wow. I just had a total flashback of my grandmother toasting nori over the gas burners in the house where I grew up.

  2. Since I lived without a gas stove for such a long time…throughout college and beyond, I used a toaster oven … 5 seconds on each side on high.

    storebought laver just doesn’t taste the same!

    I make a huge batch and then tupperware it.


  3. So does anyone know what the thicker stuff is called? I went up to Sokcho this summer with my girlfriend and we ended up at this little place where they gave us really thick, slightly sweetened stuff. I thought it was also made of seaweed, but I haven’t seen it in shops. My girlfriend says it’s harder to package and usually just homemade. Ever had this stuff? It’s wonderful… like healthy potato chips.

  4. Yes I know what you’re talking about, Gord! It’s green, about 1/8 inch thick at times, curled, sometimes salted. But definitely like a hefty potato chip.

    I know, because it is one of my LEAST favorite Korean foods (I’m ashamed to admit that I hate a Korean food). Bleah!

    It’s seaweed. A different kind than what’s used as gim, is my guess.

  5. Pingback: Toddler Loves | Muffin Top

  6. Thailand accuses Myanmar of unleashing narcotic aggression” on Thailand
    and with the stupendous enhance of methamphetamine manufacturing inside Myanmar, drug
    trafficking into Thailand from Myanmar is on the rise.

  7. In India driving is on the left of the street.
    India has the second largest highway connectivity in the world, after the US, but that doesn’t ensure street quality anyway.

  8. The realm is lush green with saplings which have now
    grown into trees planted by visiting dignitaries and heads of state.

  9. The breakfast tour takes place within the streets of Purani Dilli.

  10. On this fascinating evening stroll you possibly can observe native artisans similar to jewellers and silversmiths in their workshops and talk with the locals whilst sampling some of the area’s
    culinary delights from some of the metropolis’s most popular avenue meals vendors.

    Keep: ITC Rajputana.

  11. Simply obtained again from a fab Odyssey tour in India, doing the Golden Triangle and Varanasi.

  12. Over Night time Stay at Lodge.

  13. It’ll absolutely give you wings, actually the next best
    thing to being a hen. You are harnessed to
    a chute which has an identical function like wings.

  14. I learnt rather a lot throughout the day, and loved all of the locations I went.

  15. We are in the course of our Indian experience and every minute has been excellent.
    Much of the excellence of this tour has been because of our guide, Yusuf,
    who leaves us right now because the bigger group splits into smaller ones and goes completely different
    instructions. Yusuf has proven us many issues throughout
    the journey and in addition offered solutions, laughed at our jokes, and generally kept us
    in line.

  16. Get your ISIC low cost cards before you journey to economize overseas and sort out your travel visas and vaccinations.

  17. Notice if the stated journey date is to be cancelled or postponed.

  18. continue drive to Agra on the way in which go to Fatehpur
    Sikri, arrival at Agra and check in to Hotel.

    later on sightseeing of Agra, visit Agra Fort & Taj Mahal.

  19. Born in 1996, Arthur Piper (formally often known as Dee-Rhyme) is a producer, Dj, emcee
    and audio engineer hwiling from Latvia.

  20. This observe out is required to be able to mix your vocals with the stems of
    the rap beat to have thee highest qualkity oof song.
    This is essential to additionally standing out from competitors.
    I am positiove you already know an artist who hhas horrible high quality rap beats behind their vocals.

  21. See the ancient Swayambhunath Stupa (known to vacationers because the Monkey Temple) – Kathmandu’s most important Buddhist

  22. Purchase one get one Free Hurricanes for our Grownup guests the hour prior to every

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s